Juvenile delinquency and social control theory

The age of juvenile delinquent is not uniform all over the world. In India the age for boys is 16 years and 18 for the boys. There are certain behaviors that are not considered criminal in nature if committed by adults but they will be taken note as crime if committed by youth.

Juvenile delinquency and social control theory

Once an individual associates him or herself with criminal behavior they are labeled by their community and expected to reoffend. Society now looks at these juveniles and wonder why it is that these children are behaving in such matter.

It has been clear by now what Juvenile Delinquency is and how it affects society. A juvenile is a youth teen ranging from as young as 9 years old till the age of 18 who engage in illegal criminal behavior. Defining delinquency is not the hard part, figuring out the reasons why adolescents commit crimes is.

Juvenile delinquency and social control theory

The study of juvenile delinquency is important because it provides us with trustworthy and reliable theories that can help with understanding the motives of juveniles. These theories fall under three categories, biological, sociological and psychological Biological Theory considers delinquent behavior as predisposed and revolves around the idea that children are born to be criminals.

Cesear Lambrosso is credited for creating the major biological theory called Positivism. His theory states that individuals whom grow up committing crimes have inherited biochemical and genetic factors.

Lombroso also states that criminals tend to have certain facial features that are considered a predisposition to commit crime such as a flattened nose and supernumerary teeth. Another criminalist, Sheldon, found that different body types made individuals behave differently. For example, he believed that mesomorphs were more likely to commit crimes because they were athletic, as opposed to the physic of an endomorph, a fat person Champion, Contemporary biological theories include the Biosocial Theory which states that both adolescent thought and behavior have biological and social bases Siegel and Welsh, This theory uses genetics and social environment to determine whether or not a child will become delinquent.

While childhood behavior has a lot to do with a poor environment, disrupted socialization or inadequate parenting the biosocial theory presents the fact that we must also take into consideration their genes, because that is what ultimately makes everyone unique and makes all individuals react to their environment differently.

For example, a kid with a pathological trait such as a disability, an abnormal personality, brain damage or low IQ may be at high risk for committing crime. This risk is then increased by environmental stressors such as failure in school, bad parenting, substance abuse and delinquent peers.

There are many major social factors that are believed to cause or affect delinquent behavior such as social relations, community conditions, and level of violence, poverty, and racial disparity.

All of these factors play a huge role in the way adolescents see their lives and help them turn to delinquent behavior. There are numerous amounts of sociological theories that can describe different ways a child can become delinquent. Here are some of the ones that are most important.

Social Disorganization theory is when a community reduces the chances of advancement for the children.

Juvenile delinquency and social control theory

For example, schools have high dropout rates, high levels of graffiti, high poverty levels and so on. Residents in these areas experience conflict and despair and as a result they turn to antisocial behavior.

Cultural Deviance theories explain that due to the draining lifestyle of kids living in deteriorated neighborhoods they turn to social isolation and delinquent behavior. These behavior explained in cultural deviance create subcultures such as gangs and cults in which these adolescents join to feel accepted, loved and a part of a group.

When a society is creating conflict for a youth to achieve success, these teen experience status frustrations because they are not allowed to reach goals set by the larger society.

Siegel and Welsh, Two major types of theories include Psychodynamic theory and Social Learning theory. The Id is the drive for immediate gratification and can explain delinquency acts such as shoplifting or burglary.

The ego is the realization of real life and helps control the Id. Superego develops through interactions with parents and other responsible adults and develops the conscience of moral rules.

This psychodynamic approach states that traumatic experiences during early childhood can prevent the ego and superego from developing properly, therefore leaving the Id with greater power Champion, Social Learning theory is also a major theory that implies that criminal behavior is learned through close relations with others, it asserts that children are born good but learned to be bad.

This theory states that all people have the potential to become criminals because modern society presents many opportunities for illegal activity but one has the choice to not engage.

Social control theory - Wikipedia

If a child is raised in a clean community that has strong morals and if that child has positive role models at home and in the community, he or she is more likely to grow up achieving her goals.Gibbs is critical of Hirschi's Social Control Theory because it merely assumes that social relationships, personal investments and beliefs that discourage delinquency are social controls (which is one reason why Hirschi's theory is often referred to as a Social Bond Theory).

Juvenile Delinquency, Social Control, About Social Control, Type of Social Control, Sociology Guide A crime is termed juvenile delinquency when committed by a young person under a certain age. The age of juvenile delinquent is not uniform all over the world.

In India the age for . Social control theory asserts that strong social bonds inhibit delinquency, whereas weak bonds offer little resistance to offending. In the development of this theoretical perspective, new research suggests that the type and magnitude of social bonds have differing effects on male and female delinquency.

Social control theory proposes that exploiting the process of socialization and social learning builds self-control and can reduce the inclination to indulge in behavior recognized as antisocial.

The four types of control can help prevent juvenile delinquency are. Thus, Cohen and Short are fundamentally right when they insist that social control theory is incomplete unless it provides an impetus by which the potential for delinquency may be realized.' The impetus Matza provides is a "feeling of desperation" brought on by the 'mood of fatalism" "the experience of seeing one's self as effect" rather than.

Social control theory proposes that exploiting the process of socialization and social learning builds self-control and can reduce the inclination to indulge in behavior recognized as antisocial. The four types of control . Social Control Theory and Delinquency Created Date: Z. Gibbs is critical of Hirschi's Social Control Theory because it merely assumes that social relationships, personal investments and beliefs that discourage delinquency are social controls (which is one reason why Hirschi's theory is often referred to as a Social Bond Theory).

Social Control Theory and Delinquency Created Date: Z.

Social control theory - Wikipedia